O Mars, How Art Thou?

I came up with a book idea about Mars about four years ago. I recall watching a news story on the Mars Rover and thinking, “Hey, that’s pretty cool. We have a robot on Mars”. That means we will be taking pictures. Sending back video. On Mars. For a commoner without a space degree like myself, this was exciting. But, I can only imagine what the rest of the science community was thinking (and various alien conspiracy theorists as well). It was a memorable moment for me and when the news story was over, I was finally receiving the inspiration I so desperately needed.

Time to get to work.

Before that time, I had been dabbling with a story about an alien visiting Earth. Only this alien was not a “true alien” in the sense of what so many are familiar with. You know – having tentacles, double jaws, and acid blood. Or parading as a seductress intent on luring males to their deaths (e.g. Species and Under the Skin). So rather than explore terrifying renditions of extraterrestrials, my alien would be some form of an advanced human. One who had come to take his people from Earth. To somewhere. Far away. And for reasons that were unknown to even the ones being rescued. But, of course, those being rescued would have their suspicions:

Is this traveler only taking the “best qualified”? Only the worthy?

Or is the visitor just harvesting Earthlings under some elaborate lie? (I hate using the term “Earthlings” but hey, it fits here)

Or perhaps, it was a combination of both?

I fell in love with the idea and ran with it. Then the Mars Rover came along and you know the rest. Looking back, the choice to make Mars my destination shouldn’t have come as a shocker. Sci-fi’s forefathers have been indulging the love affair with Mars long before I was around. Perhaps one of the first was H.G. Wells’ War of the Worlds, swiftly followed by Edgar Rice Burrough’s John Carter series. Flash forward about a hundred years and we are still getting stories like Andy Weir’s The Martian. Inevitably, it can be said: we want to see what’s waiting on the 4th planet from the sun. And with the uber rich making plans to do it (see this), we can rest assured that someone is going to make it happen.

But, as I’m exploring with my own story, I’m curious to know what people will do once we’ve colonized a foreign world. Will we turn from Earth and never look back? Or will we yearn to come back home? As with anything that’s new or untouched, our human curiosity must be satisfied. We’ll only know what awaits until we go there.

 

 

 

 

Mars and Science Fiction

Wow. It’s been a while. Let’s get right to it.

Being a sci-fi enthusiast, I found myself anxiously awaiting NASA’s big Mars announcement this week. I mean, come on, we’re talking about Martians here. Did we find’em? They out there? Every book that’s ever been written about the red planet would be turned on its head if so. But, as we know, that wasn’t the big news NASA had for us. Make no mistake though, what we got was still big news: flowing salt water. Water. Flowing freely. That’s pretty cool, right? I mean, water is a precursor for life. And though there are slim chances of a Mars shark or a Mars dolphin swimming about the water highways of Mars, there’s always that slim chance something with a heartbeat could be on the red planet. Right?

Or as so many science fiction minds have imagined in the past: absolutely. 

From a literary perspective, Mars has been a source of inspiration for more than a handful of stories over the years. Perhaps most well-known is H.G. Wells’ War of the Worlds; one of modern literature’s first attempts at the alien invasion genreFirst published in 1898 (hard to imagine), Wells’ classic detailed a battle between Earth and Mars’ inhabitants, the technologically advanced “Martians.” The book was received well and consequently influenced several other science fiction writers. Most notably, perhaps, was Edgar Rice Burroughs; the man behind the John Carter series, who wrote a series of books on Mars and his fictional race of people who lived there.

But, that’s not all we got from Mars over the years.

There was the trippy and engaging film, Total Recall, that took us to a Mars where people were trying to make the air on Mars “breathable.” Oh, and there’s mutant people in it, too. Then there was Mission to Mars, a film that tried to explain the theories of the universe through the eyes of highly intelligent alien life form (I guess that’s like having mutant people?). And there was the unfortunate box office flop, Red Planet, that tried to convince us of Martian “nematodes” that eat people. No mutants, just yikes. And for the less-than-serious takers, there was the satirical Mars Attacks! A film made to intentionally mock old school alien invasion movies while poking fun at its cast throughout. Jack Nicholson is in it. Pierce Brosnan is in it. Natalie Portman is in it. And so is… well, that’s all you need to know. Mars has been host to more than a few stories where alien life is bent on our destruction. And naturally, the general public loves it. Even if it’s coming from brother Mars.

But, what about now? Does the discovery of flowing water change much? I’d be reluctant to say that it hasn’t. If nothing else, it’s provided even more inspiration for us Earthen folk. And with Matt Damon’s The Martian coming out this year, it seems like the timing couldn’t have been better. We may not be dreaming of terrifying tentacles or tripods with ray guns (well, not as much) but we do have that much more to work with. Ice miners on Mars? Rivers filled with Martian fish?

As I said earlier, I’m eager to see what’s next.