“We Couldn’t Find a Mentor. Nobody Could Help Us.” – Rachel Scott, co-author of Better Than Blended

During my first interview on The Writer’s Lens, I asked the co-authors of Better Than Blended, Willie and Rachel Scott, if there were any mentors who helped them come to where they were today. Who was it that made an impact? Who helped to put them in a position to launch their book and their ministry for blended families?

Their answer? No one.

Sounds like a scary place to be. You’re passionate about something. You have a mission; a project you want to come to fruition. But, how to start? And where? So wait, let’s see if there’s anyone out there who might be able to help us….

*insert cricket noises*

My own writing journey has often felt this way. In my downtime, I was often thinking, who out there is going to help me? Is there anybody? Anybody at all? 

When I first wrote a book, I had no idea how to get the word out. I figured I’d tell the people closest to me about it: my parents, my siblings, my co-workers. Those were safe places to start. So that’s what I did. And for a while, safe felt good. I could do the safe. Safe was manageable. Safe was comfortable.

But, safe didn’t produce a lot of growth (at least within this context). I needed to figure out how to make more of a buzz. And since there was no one in my immediate life who had any publishing or book-writing experience, I dove in head first and started swimming. And now, five years later, I’m still swimming. But, I’m doing so without a need for floaties. Or a rubber ducky. I have experience to rely on and in some ways, a chance to give mentorship to someone who is looking for it. I may not have had someone standing right next to me – much like Willie and Rachel – but as Willie and Rachel pointed out (and I’ll paraphrase), sometimes we have to walk through something so we can turn around and help others who have yet to go through it.

I found this to be very encouraging. Not only had Willie and Rachel found a calling – they’d walked into that calling and subsequently grew within it. And now they could offer the kind of mentoring and discipleship they’d hoped to have themselves. So, despite not having every piece in its place, they were able to move forward.

Yet another great lesson to be had. And one I certainly can relate to. As a writer and in my own life outside of writing.

 

Purpose in Reflection

Yesterday I was reminded of something.

That when you set a goal, you ought to track it.

So when you reach that goal, you can look back and see what it took to get there.

Case in point, I was reminded of a goal I set many months back. It happened during a radio interview I took part in back in March. I had stated I was going to do a podcast this summer – and guess what – I did. Not because I was entitled to it. Or because I had a magic formula at my disposal.

No, neither of those amount to much. It was persistence and focus that brought about these results. But, neither are worth anything if you don’t have some direction or purpose behind it (thanks to another friend of mine for that reminder too).

We can build big things. Make elaborate plans. Craft new and innovative designs; but unless we have purpose and direction, we are simply spinning our wheels. Yesterday I was reminded that purpose must be a driving force in all we do. Otherwise, we’re just wasting time in fruitless pursuits. As for me, I’ve always wanted to tell good and engaging stories. That purpose continues to push me into new and uncharted territory. And hey, that’s a good thing.

Yesterday, I was reminded of this. So today, I am encouraged to keep moving forward.