Interview with Nic Saluppo: Overcoming personal obstacles

I have a special interview to share with you this week. And though each is special, this one is unique in that it’s in written form, not audio. A friend of mine and fellow alumni of Mount Union College (now University), Nic Saluppo, is a former track star and fitness enthusiast. But, he is also someone who works to inspire others via his vocation and through his social media reach. I won’t spoil what kick-started this desire to help others so you’ll just have to read more about it below (ha!). I had bugged Nic about doing an audio interview some time ago, but due to recent struggles with his vocal cords, Nic was not able to. However, he was gracious enough to send me some answers via email that I am now happy to share with all of you.

That being said, here’s that full text below:

Nic, thanks for wanting to be interviewed. I wanted to inquire about your desire to inspire others so let’s start there. You’ve had a blog for a while now where you share plenty of inspirational quotes and stories (even having yours truly on your site). What got you started doing that?

Josh, thanks so much for having me as part of your program. What got me started with wanting to inspire people is this: Life is short. A very simple concept, but very big implications. I used to live as if my problems were actually me. That is, I identified with my problems, rather than observed my problems. As I found healing from this condition, I noticed that 99% of the population was doing the same thing. Navigating life became so much more clear for me when I gained a new perspective of listening to what my pain had to say. This is in stark contrast to living as if I am my pain. Once I began learning from the inevitable pain that comes with life, the pain wasn’t so scary anymore. As mentioned, I began noticing that most people have no other perspective other than living to avoid pain. This causes people to sacrifice relationships and never take part in living out their God-given desires. My hope was that a new perspective would allow more people to embrace who they are, including the painful parts, and therefore not need to make the unnecessary sacrifices that go along with avoiding squarely facing the painful situations that are a part of life.

 

What’s a personal triumph you try to share with others? Or perhaps turned tragedy into triumph?

Nic Saluppo

I often share about my bout with depression. From the ages of 19-27 (I’m currently 33), I struggled with depression. Now, I don’t struggle with depression because I process my emotions as they arise. By processing what arises, no struggle is necessary. What was most significant about healing my experience of depression was that I needed to face some seriously scary, dark pieces of myself. I had to stop blaming others for my sad lot in life and begin looking at the fact that some of the painful experiences I’ve had in life were not my fault, but my emotions associated with those experiences were my responsibility. Nobody was going to fix me. Even if someone wanted to, they weren’t capable of doing so because the emotions causing the depression were inside of me. If the emotion is inside of me, then I am responsible for taking measures to resolve those feelings. As a result of taking responsibility for my depression (again, being responsible for my emotions is different than being at fault for them), I took drastic measures. I drove 90 minutes to Erie, PA every week to see my mentor, and I traveled all around the US to attend various workshops. The investment was a lot of time, energy, and money. If I didn’t take responsibility for my depression, I would still be depressed.  

 

Are there any mentors you’d attribute your successes to? Why were they helpful? Why were some not so much?

There is one man who was significantly helpful in my healing journey- Ron Gainer. After knowing him for less than 10 minutes, I could tell that he knew more about me and my situation than I did. In other words, he had walked the road before me. I still had to walk the road myself, but Ron was my guide. I drove to Erie PA weekly to see him for 5 years. A lot of time and energy, but I wanted to heal. Essentially, depression results from “stuck” emotions. Something on the inside needs to be processed, to move. I’m not talking about acute depression, but chronic depression that becomes a lifestyle. I met Ron at the age of 25, and before meeting him, I was taking medication for my depression and believing the lie that if my outer circumstances were to change, then I wouldn’t feel so bad. In other words, I was looking everywhere but inside of myself for the cause of the depression. Ron told me, “If you want to heal, you need to get off the medication and have the courage to look inside. Looking inside will be painful. It will be like walking through fire. But on the other side of that pain will be great joy.” LOL: I mean, how could I have known this? There’s no way I could have known this. Yet, Ron knew that this is what needed to happen if I wanted to heal the depression. Looking inside was painful. But, as it turns out, there was great joy on the other side of the pain. He knew the path.

How do you cultivate a creative edge to what you do?

Definitely meditation. Meditation is like clearing the road. It’s like laying out the red carpet so creative ideas can walk upon it. When I go into meditation, all the thoughts, worries, and anxieties about finding an answer dissipate. Then, when I come out of meditation, creativity simply arises with no effort other than being present to it. It seems that too much analytical thinking actually blocks the creativity that is beneath all of the endless thoughts. Take writer’s block, for example. It’s not a lack of ideas, it’s that there are tons of ideas swirling around in the writer’s head, but none of them are pertinent or relevant to the current piece of writing. None of them move the piece of writing forward. The creative answer is beneath all of those swirling thoughts. And, the way to access the creative answer is by dissipating the swirling thoughts through meditation. Once the swirling thoughts have dissipated, the creative response can arise naturally.

 

I know you from your running days at Mount Union. Do you still do that? What else do you fill your time with?

Haha. Sprinting on the track team was a big part of my life. I still do some of the sprint workouts. Interestingly, I also train sprinters. I’m currently training a sprinter from my alma mater high school who is almost definitely going to break my records. What I love about sprinting is that you get out of it what you put into it. Unlike football, for example, you can train your butt off all year, but if your teammates don’t do the same, then success may still allude the team. Sprinting is much more simple- if you train well, the time on the clock will be lower than it was.

I also read a lot of books and attend workshops, both about inner healing. I’ve found that the more I work on myself, the more I can offer other people.

I said Nic was a track star, didn’t I? Here’s the proof.

What would you say to people who say they’re constantly let down by circumstances? By other people even?

I touched on this earlier, but the first thing I would say is nothing at all. People first need to know that I care about them. When I facilitate workshops, groups, and one on one coaching for inner healing, the first thing I do is ensure that the person who is dealing with a difficult circumstance knows that they have been listened to. What they are experiencing truly matters. It’s hard and painful. But, there is a less painful way, and that is the way of inner healing. The fact that there is a solution to their problem doesn’t matter much if they don’t understand that the person providing the solution cares about them. When it comes to helping those dealing with intimately personal issues, depression, for example, providing a solution is much, much different than when it comes to less personal problems (repairing a flat tire, for example).

When it comes to issues of inner turmoil, a person must first know that they are cared about. Without this, your “solution” will fall on deaf ears. Mother Teresa talks about this extensively. Do a quick Google search of “Mother Teresa quotes,” and you’ll find quote after quote about simply caring for and about people. The reason this is true is because most people dealing with inner turmoil have an underlying issue of needing to know that they matter, that they’re cared about. If they keep going forward on the journey, people will eventually realize that they can care about other people. But, when a person is raised in a family incapable of offering them love, it will be very difficult to turn a corner in life until they encounter someone who does care about them simply for the sake of caring, not in order to get something. I see many well-intentioned Christians and pastors struggle in this area. “Here’s the solution to your problem!” they say. But, the true solution is caring for the person, not giving advice. Once a person feels cared about, they will ask for advice; it can be a mistake to offer it too early.

 

Are you a believer in hard work? Having God-given talent? Or both coming together somehow?

I’m a believer in smart work, plus paying attention to circumstances.

 

What would you like to be doing if you weren’t working at your current vocation?

Working in the area of inner healing is the most meaningful thing I can think of. Last year, I facilitated a great workshop. Since then, I’ve been facilitating small groups and one on one coaching. What I’m working toward now is having a piece of land where outdoor retreats can be held. So, although I admit there are times when I wish God would move things along FASTER (I am a sprinter, after all LOL), I can’t say that I’d like to be doing anything else. I’ve been looking at a few plots of land, so prayers from yourself and your audience are greatly appreciated—if I do end up finding the right piece of land, may it be a place of healing.

 

Lastly, do you have any endeavors like penning a book or opening a gym in your future? I’m all about writing books, as you know.

I definitely touched upon this in the previous question. However, YES. I do have more writing in mind for the future. Whether it’s an e-book, or a complete 225 piece of non-fiction, I’m not yet sure. It will depend on what will best bring healing to people.

Thanks so much for having me, Josh!

 

For anyone who would like to contact Nic directly about what he does or any other follow up, you can reach him at this email: nicsaluppo@gmail.com. 

A Clear Voice

If you’re reading this, then you may have an idea of what I’m going to write about. Or maybe you don’t and you’re just curious. Either way, welcome, and here’s hoping you might identify with this post. As we know, there is no shortage of voices who claim to be authorities for navigating life. And they cover just about every topic under the sun: “Be the Best Parent”; “Make More Money Now”; “The Best Guide to Dieting” or “Epiphanies, Theories, and Downright Good Thoughts on Video Games” (sorry, had to throw that one in there for my own sake). But, at the end of the day, how many do you listen to? Well, if you’re a parent, you may tune into more parenting books. If you’re financially insecure, you read up on managing your money. The list goes on. Much of what we read is often an indicator of what we need. Or what we’ve made ourselves to believe we need.

The tricky part is knowing just what it is we need in the first place. Because as we know, there are plenty of voices telling us what it is we need. And the messages come faster than we’d like to admit.

This past week, I intentionally took a week off from Facebook. Not because I’m trying to lead a revolution against social media (I’m here, aren’t I?) but because I knew I needed something: a clear voice. For any writer or artist that might relate, you know what I mean. Yes, it’s fun to flip through your news feed and see what’s happening around the world. Or in people’s lives. I’ve done it frequently. But, there are ramifications if one isn’t careful.

For example, you see someone sharing an intriguing article and you click. That action leads to another click. And another. And another. Soon, you may find yourself reading a top 10 list of what not to do in summer whereas you first started reading a blog on rioting. At first glance, it sounds relatively harmless. You’ve become more “educated” on what’s happening in the world or you’ve been made aware of several hot travel spots you wouldn’t have considered otherwise. But, here’s the point: in a span of 10, maybe 20 minutes, you’ve allowed your brain to be subject to a multitude of incoming messages. And that sort of clutter lends itself to a cluttered mind. Rather than making crucial, timely decisions, your brain is now more interested in vacations (which is coincidentally just what it’s doing now – going on a vacation). The real issue you’ve been working on is lost in the muck and hey, that’s not good.

Reading isn’t bad. It’s fun. It’s entertaining. It’s educational. But, reading anything and everything can be bad for you. It’s why I intentionally decided to take a breather. Halt the messages and find some center ground. Not because I can’t control myself, but because it’s better to not tempt one’s self when temptation is imminent. I don’t need to be up to date on the newest blogs or even the latest hashtag. Those things have a way of finding a person if the message is good. And plus, I can check it out when I want to. Not when I feel like I need to. If what you want is a clear head, then don’t allow so many voices to fill it. It’s really that simple.

Oh, and to any I may have ignored this past week, I’m sorry. This is partially an apology for not checking my news feed. I trust we’re still friends, at least online.

 

 

 

When You Aren’t Watching

It’s hard waiting for results. For one, our expectations are rarely met and for two, we aren’t the most patient people. We ask and we expect to receive right away (we can partially thank Google for exposing this trait of ours). However, such is never the case with things that really, truly matter. Time has to be a key player. Whatever is worth doing will take time. But, what matters will also require a participant’s unyielding contribution to the journey. Just as time ushers along opportunities, time also presents hardship. This is where the will is most tested: when no one else is watching.

I find it extraordinarily difficult to tell people about my challenges as a writer (and no, this won’t be a “pity party” type of blog. Stick around a while). Unless he or she is a writer themselves, it’s a tough place to speak from. Artists, authors, architects – they’re all like event planners: starting with a concept, a sketch or an idea, and building daily until the moment of completion. It’s a different kind of work. There are no immediate outcomes. There’s only the road. And it’s a road as long and diverse as the task required of the traveler.

That’s where the will comes in. A will that must be tested and as we discover, tested daily. Nothing is more grandiose (or frustrating) than standing on one side of a canyon, seeing the other, but not knowing how long it will take to get to that other side. You can’t fly across. You can’t take a car. And you can’t hitch a ride. There’s just you, your feet, and the ideas you started with.

A lot of aspiring writers (and artists) believe there’s a “quick road” to the other side; that if they wait on the edge long enough, some miracle bus will come along. And they’ll be taken away because they deserved it for waiting so patiently. Then they’ll be able to tell everyone how smart and wise they were for doing so. There was never a need to get their hands dirty, their morale rocked, or their time “wasted” under reworks, revisions, and failures. It will come to them. Someday, it will come.

However, I’m here to tell you that this type of thinking is delusional. It doesn’t hold merit and it won’t give gratification to the journeyer. There’s a reason why the chasm is so wide: it’s meant for molding, shaping, and preparing the one whose taken the challenge. It’s meant for narrowing the job applicants. It’s meant to set free and unleash the burden of what’s inside. There is no greater risk, but there is also no greater reward.

It’s a narrow and long trail, but it’s one that must be accepted once headed off. The landscape that awaits is minefield of tiny battles. All of which, we find at the end, were laid down for our betterment. And fought when hardly anyone else was watching.

Courage – what it means to a writer?

Nowadays, most people can claim to be writers. Not that most people do; it’s just that most people can. Your coworker, your uncle, your unborn child – all are capable of having webspace. And all are capable of pushing their thoughts out for the masses to read and evaluate. We know that in the past, there was a definitive gatekeeper; someone who kept that barrier from being breached. But, today? Not so much. That’s why when I hear someone say, “I have this story idea. I think I’m going to write about it and get it published,” I can’t help but cringe a little. Not because I feel the sting of competition – I just cringe because this person has unknowingly entered into an agreement that is not what they think. Writing a bunch of thoughts down is easy. Writing a book is hard.

Generally speaking, someone’s perception of something can be lightyears from the truth. Experiencing a vision is much different than merely gazing upon that vision. That’s why when I hear those words, I don’t get angry, frustrated, or anxious – I just wonder what that person perceives as “being a writer.”

For example, I’ll be 30 this month. I’m in pretty good physical health, but if I were to tell someone, “Yeah, I’m thinking of taking up karate. World black belt champion sounds fun so I’m gonna do that” – people would probably think I’m crazy. Sure, I could do karate and work towards becoming a world class black belt, but do I possess the personal conviction to do it? Is it in my heart to work towards that goal? More than likely, there are years of practice, years of dedication, and years of failures ahead if I want that distinction. It simply won’t happen overnight. And yet, I feel like that’s what has happened to “being a writer” – we’ve seen or read stories of people who had popular blogs and we think a stellar book deal is easily achievable. Or rather, we think it’s easy because everyone is writing. Everyone has a voice somewhere. Everyone has a platform.

So, from the outside-looking-in, the logical question becomes: “Why not me? That looks easy enough….”

I don’t fault anyone for thinking that. Who am I to judge if someone has a killer idea for a story? But, in some ways, I feel like the courage associated with following that killer idea – the perception of what it takes to become an established writer – has been forgotten. And the only way someone will be recognized for having “made it” is when hashtags begin trending about their book idea. Obviously, a hashtag is not a sign of “making it”, so what is? Is that something an aspiring writer should be concerned about? Is this the only part of writing that’s “courageous” anymore – to have made it commercially or financially? People can get their 15 minutes of fame for a popular book, but is that all anyone should be after?

Well, that may all depend on what your perception of success is – a concept that’s difficult to pin down if you’re afraid of what success looks like to you. As a person who has been self-published, entered numerous writing competitions, and been freelancing for several years, the decision to be a writer was a hard one. It wasn’t as simple as creating a new Facebook page. What’s behind me, I see as a success. What’s in front of me, I see as more opportunities for success. But, success is relative without courage. And courage is relative without joy upon completion, which is truly what any writer should be after: joy. Consider who has more joy – the person who gets 15 minutes of fame for a popular, yet fleeting idea? Or the one who toils, working hard for years to master a craft that is long-standing and definitive of the voice and resolve he’s carried with him for a job well done?

The answer to that question – the person who can claim to be a writer –  is the one backed by their courage.

Desktop Update – 8.25.14

I started writing this as a means to keep my mind in order. Between wedding planning, house-hunting, and everything else going on, it’s been tough making time to just relax and quiet all the external voices that come creeping in. When you’re stressed out by any number of responsibilities, you open yourself up to distractions. I’d love to check certain things off my to-do list, but it’s more important that I keep certain things off my list too. That being said, I’m reassessing my desktop and seeing what’s out there – along with planting a screenshot for accountability’s sake:

Priorities

1. Freelancing 

This is a tough gig. Don’t let the countless websites and email solicitations fool you – if you want to be a freelancer, it’s tough work. I know plenty of folks that want to do freelancing full-time, but their time is limited and/or their portfolios just don’t have the breadth to make proper headway. The 2014 year wasn’t my first year doing the freelance thing, but it’s certainly been the most rewarding thus far. The reason? 2013 was a lot of “Hey, I’ll do that for free” – that way I could accumulate some understanding of what it means to be a freelancer. And to be honest, not many people will pay you for a work unless you’ve had experience – proven experience – to do the jobs that are asked of you. One thing I’ve learned is that getting paid isn’t always the most important thing – it’s the experience. So here’s to a stronger, better 4th quarter in 2014 and beyond.

2. My next manuscript

The screenshot is not my next manuscript, but it is a short story I completed earlier this year. And I’m still working on the rewrite as I debate how to publish or merely share online. However, since A Dinner with Titans has been done for a while, I find myself putting more and more time into my next major manuscript: The Lion’s Den. It’s been nearly a year since I started The Lion’s Den and it’s been quite a year at that. I’ve worked through several iterations, worked up about 88,000 words, and even begun all over again. There’s no way to write that lightly – it’s been hard work. And now, I’m on my 2nd rewrite and am slowly making up ground as I push myself to finish before year-end. A time when the real fun begins: how to publish and where to publish. I have some ideas on how to go about that, but I can’t concern myself with that at the moment. The best I can do is get back to business and finish what I’ve begun, reminding myself of what’s behind me and what’s in front.

A Dinner with Titans_page 1

A Dinner with Titans_page 1

3. My (other) next manuscript

Though it’s not a requirement, I would suggest this to any aspiring writer: have plenty of projects lined up. Or at the very least, a few. Changing up the creative flow of things can help loosen up the mind and set you back on track. Especially in those moments when you’re frustrated or just plain stuck. I’ve never had an issue with this –  I’ve been working on sporadically on several – and these other works have helped to keep my head above water, but they’ve also restricted me from sinking into the bowels of a single idea that could make or break my spirit. That just wouldn’t be a good place to be in. First things, first though – finish the manuscript and then deviate my attention as appropriate.

Not Priorities

1. Starting another blog / building a new website

2. Searching for editors / publishers / agents

3. Allowing myself to get frustrated

 

 

My website, the graveyard

I’ve been in the midst of a website reboot for some time now. I hate this whole idea of “branding for the sake of branding” so I’m choosing to think that my situation is wholly different than the next person. There’s definitely a need to differentiate one’s self, but my time is often too limited to give my webpage much thought. I have a blog, I write in it often, and I keep myself updated on all the things I need to be doing. However, I found myself truly convicted by the drabness of my website earlier this week. Several times over, actually. And that was no fun whatsoever.

To paint a picture – one of the perks of my part-time job is the events. Alpha, my employer, had one this weekend that hosted 1,400 people here in Cleveland. It was excellent. A sold out crowd came to see Fernando Ortega perform at Grace Church. I even got to hang a bit with the performer, Fernando himself, so that was cool. But in addition to all that, I made contact with several people I’ve never met before. And we had conversations about life outside of my part-time / not-so-part-time work with Alpha. That means, having a conversation about my writing life. Which then leads to that pinnacle question nearly every blogger / writer is dying to be asked: “What’s your website address and how do I read some of your stuff?” I was shocked how many times this came up, but I was disappointed with how many times I backpedaled on myself, immediately thinking of ways to defend the visual mediocrity of my webpage.

Ugh.

So that’s what brings me here. I took a long look at my blog earlier today and I’ve come to the conclusion that it needs a bit of a makeover. When and how I’ll do this, I’m sorting through, but I understand the need for an artistic upgrade. Killing off the drab gray could be a start, perhaps? Or maybe some pictures or new categories? I’m learning much in this realm of social media but I’m grateful to have accumulated what I already have to this point. What is clear to me, though, is the requirement of a better presentation. As much as I believe the writer’s content as his greatest contribution, there is something to be said for a sexy-looking homepage. One that’s devoid of the “usual” aesthetics, but still pleasing on the eyes.

I’m not worried though. There are plenty of stokes in the fire on that front so it’s exciting more so than it is intimidating.

More to come on that later.

Special, Bonus, Extra Features…for writers

Some years ago, our VHS tapes were traded in for DVDs. Do you remember this? Home entertainment changed – No more recording shows on a clunky recorder. No more rewinding or fast forwarding to that funny “whizz whizz” noise. And no more home movies being taped via that huge shoulder-mounted tape recorder that your family owned. Movies and television shows were making the jump to Digital Video Disc. Picture quality was better, sound was smoother – VHS tapes were soon to be obsolete.

Sigh, I think I just had some serious nostalgia….

Well, sweet nostalgia aside, the arrival of DVDs brought another big thing with them: the “bonus disc”. For the science fiction geek, it was the holy grail of movie fandom. The Lord of the Rings was one of the first to cash in on this concept. Not only was there the “regular” DVD, you could also get the DVD with “special features disc”. Three hours of extra footage that included interviews, how the hobbit’s feet were made, and original cut scenes. It was all there. But wait! That’s not all. Some time later, the “Special Extended Edition” disc was released and the Tolkien universe rejoiced. Now you had the movie, the bonus features, and hours more of scenes that extended the experience. Wow, right? The DVD was more than just an upgraded conduit for home entertainment, it was a money-making missile aimed straight at the hearts and imaginations of anyone who wished to be closer to the cinematic experience.

But I won’t rain on the parade. Bonus discs can and do offer some interesting insight to any fan who is willing to pay a little extra. Imagine having the opportunity to find out just what someone was thinking when they filmed that pivotal death scene? Or why the director decided to nix that particular musical score for the climax? The bonus disc allowed for this to happen. Granted, not every question could be answered but the window had been opened.

As a writer, there is no special features disc when it comes to writing books and sharing story. You may get a bonus disc, which we may call a “sequel”, but that’s about it. I found this to be a unique insight; one that a friend of mine brought to light recently. Whenever I share a story with people I know, they give me immediate feedback. Then they may ask me questions. Why did you do this? What were you thinking about there? To which, I can reply and answer. But if you’re writing something for people beyond your social circle, there’s no Q and A time. This may appear to be an obvious concept, but let me extrapolate that further.

You see, stories are interpreted differently from person to person. The visuals created in their head are theirs and theirs alone. But a writer may have a different vision. Or will provide details meant to create that vision. As such, some readers often miss the intimate details of a writer’s vision. Writing is an intimate experience for the writer, but it’s not always as intimate for the reader. Writers provide, readers receive but a reader may miss the point of what the writer is trying to convey altogether. Yes, it does happen. And when that happens, there’s no bonus disc for the reader to dive into and find out what the deal was. It’s up to interpretation – no added interviews, no backstage with the film crew, and certainly no added scene to fill in the gaps. There’s great mystery and excitement in that because let’s face it, you can’t please everyone. But there is little opportunity for interaction if there are still lingering questions or a desire to seek more information.

Well, no worries because now we have blogs. It’s a writer’s very own “special, bonus, extra features” hub for sharing any additional thoughts and comments. Space is available for feedback (should you choose to accept it) and along with that, virtually anyone can pick the brain of the person they enjoy reading. That’s a cool concept, but overwhelming too. It’s something I’ve enjoyed though and I continue to look forward with each new post I make. The same can be said for anyone else’s work I follow or comment on. And what’s more, it’s free. No extra money needed to comment, post, and everything else. Way to go, social media. Nicely done.

Till the next bonus features post then.

My Blog’s One-Year Anniversary

Wahoo, right? Last week, I noticed a strange symbol on my WordPress homepage. It wasn’t the normal “star” that pops up when you get a notification – this is when someone “likes” or comments on your blog. So I clicked on it and a message popped up saying, “Congratulations, it’s the anniversary of your blog – 1 year”.

1 year, eh? That went by rather quickly, I feel. 365 days, 8,760 hours, 525,600 minutes, 31,536,000 seconds – that’s the duration (give or take a few seconds). So long as my math is correct, that’s how long my blog has been “alive”. I breathed life into this thing a little over a year ago and now here we are. I’ve had 40+ posts, 40+ comments and a little over 1,500 views. By the numbers, that’s nearly 1 post every 9 days. Or if you prefer, that’s 1 post every 863,400 seconds. I’m not a numbers guy by nature, but it’s intriguing to see the results of one’s labor.

But that’s about as much as interest I have in crunching the numbers on a blog. When it comes to writing, you really can’t quantify the experience. I could sit here and drabble on for hours about the number of views I had per day, or how many comments I accumulated per minute, but none of that would mean anything to me in the long run. The words we use and engage others with are lost once they’re said. Our mouths project our thoughts or feelings and then it’s over. Essentially, our words are an intangible thing; spoken with uncalculated power and oftentimes received with unforeseeable results. For exmample, if I add 1 and 1 together, I will always get 2, but if I say the same thing to two different people, I will not always get the same response.

Ironically, words have a dual nature. They can, in fact, be made tangible through written text. Rather than remain a fleeting object, words can be recorded and referenced time and time again. In this way, our words do not leave us completely. They can withstand years of heavy weather like a steel bridge or a brick building, accessible to the user so long as someone is willing to tend and keep them for future usage.

As a writer, you may struggle with the duality of words – I certainly have. I may not possess the inherent skill to build an engine from scratch or bake brownies with continual success (Lord knows I wish I could), but I have always had a knack for recognizing the structure of a sentence and the power it holds within. A few good words can plant themselves firmly in the depths of a mind and thus, help him navigate through the darkest of his days. Conversely, a few ill words can penetrate even deeper, thus forming an infection of the mind capable of crippling that person for life. And the only thing that will cure the diseased spirit are words of a completely different nature.

I will probably always be in amazement at the power of a few chosen words; for good or for bad. When you hear someone say, “Hey, did you ever hear that one quote?” or “Did you ever read that one book?” you either lean in for a good lesson or you back off due to some bad experience you had before. There is no neutral zone with words; they bring a reaction that the recipient may or may not have ever seen coming. That is what I find to be the most intriguing.

So a year over and my blog is technically a year old. To dig a little deeper, my written words are technically a year old. And what’s the reward? Well, WordPress tells me it’s a tiny trophy and a congratulatory comment. That’s not too bad, I figure. Yeah, I’d prefer a check in the mail (preferably a HEFTY check) but I’m am fully aware that this will not be happening. That’s not to say that if it did, I wouldn’t be grateful; I’d just be really suspicious as to why it came in the first place. In which case, I will show my respect to WordPress by drawing a large trophy with a “thank you” painted on the front.

You can’t put a value on that type of artistry, I assure you.