The Writer’s Lens – Interview 16: Jordan Raynor, “All Writers Are Entrepreneurs”

Jordan Raynor is the national bestselling author of Called to Create, a book that was birthed out of Jordan’s desire to speak into the reasons for why we create what we create. You can find our YouTube interview here.

Over the course of several years and even more interviews, Called to Create was released in November of 2017 and will now be followed up by Master of One, due out in January 2020.

Jordan is a speaker and self-described serial entrepreneur – a title he says applies to anyone who writes; for all writers are entrepreneurs at heart. My interview with Jordan was a special treat as I have read his book and felt strongly impacted by it. We discuss a wide array of topics including how to be more disciplined, our identities apart from work, and Jordan’s path to publication.

For the audio-only version of the podcast, you can check it out here.

And you can find out more about Jordan by visiting his website at http://www.jordanraynor.com and follow him on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.

Narrative Wars 02: Your Life Is Part Of A Bigger Story

Do you feel that is true? Do you feel like it’s not true?

Whether we choose to admit it or not, our lives are entangled in bigger stories. In this episode, we’ll explore the concept of a Macro-Narrative – the ‘big picture’; and the Micro-Narrative – the individual’s actual experience.

Be sure to subscribe on Podbean, Spotify, Google Play , iTunes– however else you might find and enjoy podcasts! Keywords: “The Writer’s Lens”

Guest Appearance – “Jesus Smart: The Podcast” with Brian Del Turco

In case you missed it, I was fortunate to be a return guest on Jesus Smart: The Podcast this past week. It’s my second time conversing with fellow content creator Brian Del Turco, the voice of Jesus Smart, and this time around we discussed goal-setting for the new year and how that plays a role in establishing our personal narratives.

To check out the full episode, you can check out the following links:

 

And here are the links to our prior conversation (broken into two parts) from my first appearance:

 

The “Pens of Steel” Group Discussion Special: Making A Digital Footprint

What is a digital footprint?

In part 3 of this “Pens of Steel” group discussion, we wrap up our conversation about digital voices and what each of us is doing in our pursuits to hone our unique digital footprints.

As this is part three, be sure to check out our earlier discussions (if you haven’t already) by clicking the links below.

Part 1: What Is A Digital Voice?

Part 2: Competing In The Sea Of Digital Voices

Brian Del Turco, owner/operator of LifeVoiceQuest

Website: http://www.lifevoicequest.com/

Podcast: http://www.jesussmart.com/

Willie Scott, co-founder of Better Than Blended and T.K.I. Publishing

Website: https://betterthanblended.com/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/betterthanblended/?hl=en

Brent Mclaughlin, writer

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brent.mclaughlin

 

The Writer’s Lens – E37: Villains…What Are They Exactly?

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-dhx5a-94cae9

Just as the title implies, what makes up a villain anyway? I’m sure if we all thought long enough, we could come up with various versions of what we thought a villain was. What he looked like. What he sounded like. What his motivations were. And even what story he’d fit in best.  

In this episode, I take a break from talking about heroes and dive into what makes a really good villain (strange or exciting as that may sound). Is it looks? Is it speech? is it a really cool weapon? There are plenty of factors that can make up a really good villain. But, if there’s one thing that unites them all, it’s this: a forceful opposition to the hero of the story they are a part of.    

To support this podcast, be sure to check out patron.podbean.com/jclfaltot

And be sure to find more about this podcast at jclfaltot.com 

The Writer’s Lens – E36: If We All Know We Are Supposed To Be The Hero, Then Why Aren’t We?

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-2z4hj-944c4e

We idolize heroes. We emulate them too. But, which is easier to do? Not a trick question – it’s the former. 

When it comes to heroes and the heroic deeds we read about, it’s easy to sit back and marvel as a bystander might. Yet, something inside all of us tugs at our hearts. We yearn to not only see and pay witness to heroes; we want to be heroes too. 

But, as our lives unfold, we learn how being the hero is no easy feat. As Joseph Campbell points out in his “Hero’s Journey”, the first test of any great hero tale is when the ordinary character crosses the threshold from the familiar to the unfamiliar. From the known to the unknown. From the predictable to the unpredictable. 

And that’s what this episode is all about: moving from what’s known to what’s unknown. I take a deeper look at why it’s so hard for us to be heroes in real life. How we love predictability and how, if we can, we’d prefer to stay with what’s comfortable rather than what’s uncomfortable but potentially good for us in the long run. Additionally, I share some of my own experiences where I’ve seen real heroism in action. Namely, from my own parents. 

Oh, and I give a plug for why I consider writing to be heroic in its own right. Because, well, of course writing is heroic in some way, shape, or form…right? 

To support The Writer’s Lens, go here

To check out more from me, J.C.L. Faltot, go here

Or, to follow me on Facebook, you can check me out here

 

The Writer’s Lens – E35: What Is The “Hero’s Journey?”

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-w89iv-93d7bb

The late Joseph Campbell, a former professor of literature at Sarah Lawrence College, coined a popular phrase in the mid-20th century known as “The Hero’s Journey.” Campbell had been studying the significance of storytelling. And how we tend to gravitate towards a particular formula – one which Campbell authored with The Hero of a Thousand Faces. 

In this episode, I go through Campbell’s outline of the Hero’s Journey. Thanks to movieoutline.com for providing a handy 12-step guide on how to assess Campbell’s monomyth, aka the Hero’s Journey. This will be the beginning of a multi-episode section where I talk about heroes and their impact on culture and society. 

And P.S. if you’d like to support this channel, then please do so by heading over to my crowdfunding page. You can find it on patron.podbean.com/jclfaltot. 

Enjoy! 

Facebook Launch Interview – Dr. Robert Snyder, author of “Why Did Daddy Have To Leave?”

About a week ago, I was fortunate to take part in Dr. Rober Snyder’s Book Launch event for Why Did Daddy Have To Leave? – a children’s book detailing the things a child may go through when his parent goes off to war. Dr. Snyder is an Iraqi war veteran and fellow author friend of mine, among other titles including educator and P90X instructor.

Below I’ve included a link to the full interview where I take Rob through his inspiration to write the book as well as what his time was like overseas.

Here’s that link: Click here

And P.S. – please excuse the slight lapse in sound with the video (I’ll go ahead and take the blame for the connection speed if need be, Rob).

The Writer’s Lens – E34: Heroes and Anti-Heroes – Which Do You Prefer?

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-gmiiv-92eb6f

We love heroes. We aspire to be like them. We adore what makes them great. And we want to be around them. 

Yet, as much as we love heroes, we also have an adoration for anti-heroes too. You know, the lone wolves. The girls who diverge from conventional attitudes; the single-minded warriors. Anti-heroes have as much sway in our culture as the tried and true heroes. 

But, why? What makes them attractive? If the anti-hero is not the standard of excellence, then why gravitate towards them? 

In this episode, I take a deeper look at why we love both types of heroes. And even how the time of our life can be a big reason for it. 

P.S. be sure to check out my Facebook live launch party with Dr. Robert Snyder and his book, Why Did Daddy Have to Leave? This book is a follow up to What Is A Veteran, Anyway? – a children’s book detailing what veterans are and what those in the armed services do for the United States. 

You can find Dr. Snyder at https://www.robertsnyderbooks.com/

The Writer’s Lens – E33: “Soul Mates” In Storytelling – What Are They?

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-cy464-9236b2

“You complete me” – Jerry Maguire. 

It’s a famous line from the ’90s. One that spawned a great many parodies and memes in its wake. It’s a statement of love from one person to another. That without you, I’m not me. Or at the very least, I’m not the me I’m meant to be. You’re my soul mate – the one who completes my existence.

Yet – at the risk of sounding like a major Debbie downer – is this concept really true? Be it in the context of a fictional story or our waking lives. Truth can be stranger than fiction, but fiction can communicate truths in indirect ways. So, in this – rather ranty – episode, I dive deeper into what constitutes a “soul mate” in story. What does it look like? Why is it so attractive? And from my own perspective, does such a thing actually exist (fictional or non-fictional). And if you disagree, let me know. As a writer, I’m open to critique. 

Mostly. 

Enjoy! 

 

Links

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